Oil Pipeline News

Posted: September 26, 2010 in GREEN, Table Of Contents, TRUTH / Occupy

This posting will list news about pipelines.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

NE Politicians Heineman and Bruning ILLEGALLY ACCEPT Campaign Contributions from TransCanada and Blame and simply say “oops, sorry, you caught us. Here take it back!”

no punishment or state  fine because there is no NE law against it and only the Federal Election Commission can fine them which will never happen unless hundreds of people all write the FEC. SO DO IT NOW PLEASE!!!!


http://www.fec.gov/fecig/contact.shtml

Published Tuesday October 5, 2010
Heineman, Bruning return donations
By Paul Hammel <mailto:paul.hammel@owh.com>
WORLD-HERALD BUREAU

« Metro/Region <http://www.omaha.com/section/NEWS01>
LINCOLN — Gov. Dave Heineman and Attorney General Jon Bruning mistakenly accepted $2,500 each in campaign contributions from a Canadian company seeking to build a crude-oil pipeline across Nebraska.


Taking contributions from foreigners or foreign corporations such as TransCanada Inc. violates federal campaign finance laws.

Frank Daley, executive director of the Nebraska Accountability and Disclosure Commission, said Tuesday that an auditor in his office recently noticed the contributions from TransCanada, which has a satellite office in Omaha but is based in Calgary, Alberta.

He said he alerted the campaigns about the issue last week and said both have since refunded the contributions. The state, Daley said, has no laws banning such donations, so his office would not take additional action.

Julie Queen, a spokeswoman with the Federal Election Commission, said if someone filed a complaint about the donations, her office would investigate.
TransCanada is seeking federal approval to build a crude-oil pipeline from the tar sands region of western Canada to oil refineries on the Gulf Coast. The company says it will bring a reliable flow of oil to the United State from a friendly nation.

Environmentalists have criticized the project as unnecessary and as a threat to drinking water drawn from the Ogallala Aquifer and to boreal forests of Canada.

A spokesman for Heineman’s campaign did not immediately return phone calls seeking comment.

Holley Bolen a spokeswoman for the Bruning campaign said that they were unaware that the federal rule applied to state political campaigns. Out of an “abundance of caution,” she said the campaign decided to return the money

Contact the writer:

402-473-9584

paul.hammel@owh.com

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Currently TransCanada is attempting to pay Nebraska Politicians to approve clearance for a pipeline over top of the Ogalala Aquifer.

Updates from Sierra Club Nebraska

http://sierranebraska.org/?page_id=929


XL Pipeline

TransCanada proposes to construct a pipeline to transport crude oil from the tar sand mines in Canada to New Orleans. This pipeline would pass through the Sandhills and Niobrara River Valley of Nebraska – over the Ogallala Aquifer -one of the world’s largest supplies of groundwater.

The Sierra Club and its Nebraska Chapter vehemently oppose the construction of this pipeline and are acting to defeat its construction. This page will provide links to resources on this topic and list upcoming actions by Sierra Club or its conservation alllies. Please check here regularly for updates.

UPCOMING ACTIONS:
Rally to Inform the Public and Demonstrate Our Opposition to the Keystone XL Pipeline
When: Thursday, Oct. 7, 5-7 p.m.
Where: 72 & Pacific

I have signs in my trunk for those who don’t have any, but feel free to make your own. I’ll be in the parking lot on the southeast corner of the intersection. We’re having an impact – every time we do these rallies, people ask for more information. Read the rest of this entry>>

Thurs. Oct. 28, 7 p.m. – Keystone XL Pipeline: A Nebraska Perspective
MoValley Sierra Club October Program:explore the environmental implications of the proposed Keystone XL Pipeline
First United Methodist Church, 69th & Cass Streets, Omaha
Click here for more info

WEBSITES/CONTACT PERSONS OF KEY ALLIES AGAINST XL PIPELINE:
Nebraska Sierra Club (sierranebraska.org) – Ken Winston 402-212-3737; kwinston@inebraska.com

Nebraskans for Peace (nebraskansforpeace.org) – Tim Rinne 402-475-4620; walterinne@neb.rr.com

Bold Nebraska (boldnebraska.org) Jane Kleeb 402-705-3622; jane@boldnebraska.org

Nebraska Wildlife Federation (nebraskawildlife.org) – Duane Hovorka 402-477-1008; NebraskaWildlife@windstream.net

Guardians of the Good Life (guardiansofthegoodlife.wordpress.com) – Candy Bless jynsweet@yahoo.com or Jane Wilson japlapoo@netzero.net

RECENT ACTIONS:
Thursday, Sept. 30, 5-7 p.m. – Demonstration with signs at Omaha’s Old Market, 11th & Howard

Thursday, September 23, 5pm-7pm, – Demonstration with signs at 90th & Maple, Omaha

Thursday, September 16, 5pm-7pm, – Demonstration with signs at 90th & Maple, Omaha.

Thursday, September 9, 5pm-7pm, – Demonstration with signs at 90th & Maple, Omaha.

Tuesday, August 31, 5pm-7pm, – Demonstration with signs at 90th & Maple, Omaha.

August 27 – Press release to all Nebraska newspapers (over 600) regarding TransCanada threat to use eminent domain to force all landowners in their path to condemn individuals private land.
“Nebraska Elected Officials Should Stand Up For Landowners Against TransCanada Pipeline Company”
For more information on this release contact:
Ken Winston 402-212-3737; kwinston@inebraska.com
Jane Kleeb 402-705-3622; jane@boldnebraska.org

RESOURCES/LINKS:
Keystone Pipeline Update (by Sierra Club Nebraska Chapter Lobbyist)

Join “Week of Action” – Rallies Against Keystone XL Pipeline

Coalition Continues Action to Oppose Keystone XL Pipeline

Nebraska Sierra Club Opposes Keystone XL Pipeline

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Updates from BoldNebraska.org Team

Here is a copy of the threatening letter TransCanada Keystone has sent to landowners to pressure them to sell easment access rights.

http://motherjones.com/files/Keystone_landowner_letter1.pdf

We still do not have a definite answer as to when the Dept. of State will
release the final EIS.  Some estimates are December, others are not until
April 2011.

State Senator Tony Fulton, a conservative member of the state legislature,
sent a letter to the Dept. of State asking a series of questions about the
safety of the pipeline, his letter is attached.  I encourage you to send him
an email thanking him for standing up for Nebraskans, nbadeer@leg.ne.gov
(that is his legislative aide’s email, she will forward any messages on to
Sen. Fulton)

Bold and Sierra Club sent a press release this morning calling on our state
leaders to require TransCanada to stop their bullying tactics of landowners.
TransCanada sent letters to landowners requiring them to sign a contract or
they would pursue eminent domain–even though the project has NOT YET been
approved.  This not only shows TransCanada as a bad business partners, it
shows they have complete disregard for the law and puts a big light on the
need for stronger laws in our state to protect landowners and the
environment.

Actions
We developed the flyer attached that you can email and/or print out and give
to friends.  It includes the basic information about the pipeline as well as
a call to action with getting more letters into Governor Heineman.  It is
also online at
http://boldnebraska.org/uploaded/pdf//TakeAction_StopTransCandaPipeline.pdf

We are planning a press conference and action that will be outside the
capitol for sometime in early September.  Watch www.boldnebraska.org
<http://www.boldnebraska.org/>  for more details because we will need you to
help.  We will not be doing a traditional press conference, we instead will
also be doing an action and we can not pull it off without all of  you.

A reminder, we have resources and links on our website for the pipeline at
http://www.boldnebraska.org/pipeline-background-resources

If you have any questions or ideas (or if you are a landowner), please let
us know!

-jane kleeb + the bold team

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

TransCanada Pipeline Testimony by Teri J. Taylor, a rancher near Newport, Nebraska.  Column 1st Published by “Local View” Nebraska.

I have never considered myself much of an activist, unless you consider trying to keep up with the daily rigors of a family-owned and operated cattle ranch, an activist. Perhaps I am actually guilty of complacency, seeking to shield myself from outside distractions that may deter me from living day to day doing what my family and I choose to do: ranch. I am sure in everyone’s life there comes a time when complacency just doesn’t “cut it,” when it is necessary to step up to the plate and take a stand.

When faced with the prospect of a Canadian company building a pipeline through our property and across the state of Nebraska, our secure life of complacency abruptly ended. When TransCanada released its plans to build Keystone XL Pipeline, a 36-inch-diameter pipeline carrying 650,000-plus barrels of crude oil per day from Alberta, Canada, to Houston, we were at first reluctant to believe that it was indeed an actuality.

Further research and eventual public meetings brought the entire plan into focus. We found ourselves facing the prospect of this vast project bisecting our ranches in Keya Paha, Rock and Holt counties. Our initial concern was with the damage that the construction itself would have on our fragile Sandhill pastures. As the pipeline would snake its way across the country, it would require a 110-foot easement (50-foot permanent and 60-foot temporary). We knew all too well what disturbing this type of soil would create and became determined to do whatever we could not to let that happen.
We always have believed that the best defense in any situation is knowledge. We began to educate ourselves, using every source at our disposal to learn about this company’s plans for our future. The more we researched, the more nervous we became. It soon became apparent that this threat went beyond the perimeters of our own ranch and was a threat to the entire state of Nebraska.

As the media began filling our homes with news of the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, a pipeline leak in Salt Lake City and oil spewing from a ruptured pipeline in Michigan contaminating the ocean, lakes and rivers, we knew that the lifeblood of the entire Midwest, the Ogallala Aquifer, was in imminent danger.

One hundred thousand letters were submitted, testimony was given, officials were contacted and good news was received. The State Department delayed the permitting process until more information could be gathered and until a more complete environmental impact statement could be drafted. As we relished in this small victory, TransCanada remained relentless, going so far as to threaten eminent domain on landowners who refused to sign easements on a project yet to be sanctioned by our own government.

In the meantime, word was spreading quickly, much like oil through a clear running stream, and single voices became choirs, echoing our own qualms. There is too great of risk to our environment to allow this project to continue. As in every situation, there are also those proponents who are singing the accolades of the Keystone XL project: the economic development, jobs being created, tax revenue collected and, of course, an oil source from a friendly country. Even landowners who once were as passionate as we are were suddenly having second thoughts when offers of easement payments were placed before them.

To this our questions remain the same: How do you place a price tag on the water source of nearly a million people? How do you justify jeopardizing that water source for monetary gain? What price are you willing to pay for the damage caused to thousands of acres of fragile sandhill ground? What
words do you use to explain to your children and grandchildren that their future may be gravely altered by the choices being made today and all for financial gain?

This I cannot do. Therefore, I can no longer be complacent nor can I be silenced. I firmly believe that this pipeline project through the Sandhills and in the Ogallala Aquifer is grievously wrong at any price.

In the words of Cree Prophecy:
Only after the last tree has been cut down,
Only after the last river has been poisoned,
Only after the last fish has been caught,
Only then will you find that money cannot be eaten.

Teri J. Taylor is a rancher near Newport, Nebraska.

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

STANTON ‹ In November 2009, the Keystone pipeline was completed on our
property in Stanton County 2#-I miles west of here. We had almost one mile
of pipeline, some through farm land and some through pasture land. The
pasture land is a series of old river beds. The soils here are almost 100
percent sand and are especially flood prone. The pipes are buried in this
area at a depth of 4 to 5 feet.

We now have a very serious potential problem which I will describe.
In the middle of June 2010, we had a record-breaking flood on the Elkhorn
River
that did extensive damage. Our entire farm was under water for five
days with the landscape changed forever in some areas. There was a vast
amount of severe erosion on the river banks and also in fields where there
were heavy currents over a long period of time. The CRP land that I own was
hit the worst as the river bank that once protected it was already very low.
As a result, a channel was cut right through the middle of this field. This
awesome force of water also blew out the county road in three places and ran
with full force over the pipeline in my pasture for five days, thereby
causing severe erosion and massive tree damage on the east side of the
pipeline.

As a firsthand witness to the totality of the tragedy, I truly believe that
if the water would have stayed at this level 24 to 48 hours longer, a whole
new river channel would have been carved right through the Keystone
pipeline. Keystone has dodged a huge bullet this time.

What can be done to alter this natural process that continues to unfold on
the river? My neighbor to the south and I have constructed several large
earthen dikes in areas that were low and easily breached during times of
high water. We also applied for permits from the U. S. Army Corps of
Engineers
to build concrete jetties so that the river does not destroy the
dikes we spent a month building. We also asked Keystone many times for help
in this matter, believing that they have a lot at stake in preventing a
possible disaster. They sent personnel to look at the situation, such as
surveyors who spent four days taking elevation readings. But all they could
do is report on their findings.

We strongly believe that if only Keystone had at least shown some interest
in this matter, maybe our permits would not have been denied.

A question:
Why would a large company such as Keystone want to risk a potential disaster
like this when they are already facing so much public scrutiny in the
Nebraska Sandhills? They can¹t even step up to the plate here and admit that
there are some issues that need to be taken care of. Why, then, would anyone
be inclined to trust these people to go through a fragile area like the
Nebraska Sandhills?

We also own land in Holt County that will be affected by Keystone XL. I can
say from experience that if you ask for help you are not going to get any
from Keystone because they do not want anyone to think there might be a
problem on the first pipeline.

That is why a letter such as this needed to be written.

Early in September we met with people from U.S. Fish and Wildlife, DEQ,
State of Nebraska Fish and Wildlife, Army Corps of Engineers and Nebraska
Game & Parks. No one from Keystone showed up although they said someone
would be out later in the week to take soil samples. We explained what our
intentions were on stabilizing the river banks. Apparently no one caught on
to the fact that the pipeline was in danger, is in danger and will remain in
danger until current problems are resolved.

The Army Corps of Engineers issues permits based on input from other
government agencies. Three weeks after the September meeting we received
notice that permission to build jetties was denied. Every agency gave a
negative recommendation.

We are planning to apply again very shortly, hoping to get something done
before the high water of spring arrives. We have already done a considerable
amount of work and funded temporary safeguards. But the total repair costs
are just too much for any one party to bear. Thus, we seek help from
Keystone and Stanton County.

I certainly hope that responsible people can be alerted to do what is right
and what is necessary before it is too late.

DON KILCHENMANN

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~`

TEXAS Updates

There seems to be a lot of lobbying and media activity about the pipeline
this week – local newspaper article, radio and TV ads across Nebraska, and
this was posted to the NEAC (Nebraska Environmental Action Coalition) email
list this morning about Texas and Oklahoma:

Texas Pipeline Landowners Say ³No Thanks² to Canadian Pipeline
Posted on September 29, 2010
<http://plainsjusticeblog.wordpress.com/2010/09/29/texas-pipeline-landowners
-say-no-thanks-to-canadian-pipeline/>  by claseur
<http://plainsjusticeblog.wordpress.com/author/claseur/>
Plains Justice Today

Fresh in inbox is a Texas Landowners Documentary
<http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QotpWw6AmFA>, about the proposed Keystone XL
pipeline, available on YouTube. The Center for Energy Matters
<http://centerforenergymatters.org/blog/>, which produced the video, is a
little group of Oklahomans and Texans who have decided that a foreign
corporation using eminent domain to take land that locals don¹t want to sell
for a project locals don¹t want is not okay.
The Center¹s leadership includes Mike Bergey
<http://www.bergey.com/About_BWC.htm> , a leading wind power entrepreneur,
other clean energy businesspeople, and attorney Harlan Hentges, a University
of Texas law
graduate whose Edmond, OK firm is called Organic Lawyers
<http://organiclawyers.com/>.

News reports
<http://www.ketknbc.com/news/a-pipeline-slices-through-east-texas>  about
the formation of a new Texas group, ³STOP² (Stop the Tar Sands Oil
Pipelines), cite lack of response from Texas Congresspeople as one reason
why landowners and residents near the pipeline route are speaking up for
themselves.

News reports also followed up with TransCanada¹s response
<http://www.ketknbc.com/news/no-pipeline-in-my-backyard>  to ³STOP².  T.C.
spokesman James Prescott says: ³When we make a financial commitment to a
landowner, as if we are buying their property, and we get limited rights to
it, we get access to it, we¹re not buying it. It¹s still theirs to do with
as they see fit. And we¹ve already acquired easements from two thirds of the
landowners on the route in Texas. And we¹re on the hook. It¹s our risk, not
theirs.²
TransCanada adds
<http://www.ketknbc.com/news/update-no-pipeline-in-my-back-yard>  that they
are ³unbelievably forthcoming² about the contents of the pipeline, including
the chemical diluents, and that it¹s no secret: ³What¹s in the pipeline, no
we don¹t mix it with a lot of chemicals,² said Prescott. ³Let¹s talk about
that. Let¹s have that discussion. Now you¹re getting into some fairly
detailed stuff, and I¹d be happy to provide you with that information. It¹s
not secret. We¹re unbelievably forthcoming on this project.²

There¹s some debate on the news website about what the diluent is, so Plains
Justice took a look at TransCanada¹s disclosure documents for the Keystone I
pipeline. The Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) provided in the Keystone I
Emergency Response Plan identify a variety of substances that may be used as
diluents, including synthetic crude oil, natural gas condensates, naphtha
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naphtha> , petroleum distillates, clarified
oils, various and ³residues.²

Technically, ³diluents² are any substances that decrease the viscosity of
bitumen to make it transportable.  In general, diluents are lighter
petroleum substances that are either naturally formed (such as natural gas
condensates) or semi-refined.  Diluent is not a particular chemical, but a
class of petroleum substances.  Basically, it¹s the runniest and cheapest
light oil the industry can lay its hands on in large amounts.
The industry also appears to be using semi refined materials derived from
refining other crude oils, including naphtha and other distillates.  One
example of the makeup of diluents is included below. As you can see, it¹s
not a very exact formula and may vary from batch to batch and pipeline to
pipeline, which probably isn¹t what you want to hear when it¹s going to be
running through your backyard or under your fields.
Source:  Shell Canada MSDS, ³Albian Heavy Synthetic Crude²
Hydrocracked Residues  30-50%
Petroleum ­ crude oil 25-70%
Naphtha, hydrotreated Light 0-30%
Natural Gas condensates  0-20%
Nat Gas Condensates (C2-C20)  0-20%
Residues (Petroleum) Vacuum  0-15%
Distillates Hydrotreated Middle 0-12.5%
Naphtha, Hydrotreated Heavy   0-12.5%
Naphtha, heavy Hydrocracked   0-12%
Clarified Oils, Catalytic Cracked  2-10%
Naphtha, heavy straight-run  0-6%
Naphtha, Light straight-run  0-6%
Distillates, straight-run    0-5%
Benzene   0.1-1%
Xylene   0.1-0.5%
Ethylbenzene 0.05-0.5%
Plains Justice Today  <http://plainsjusticeblog.wordpress.com/>

I have never considered myself much of an activist, unless you consider
trying to keep up with the daily rigors of a family-owned and operated
cattle ranch, an activist.
Perhaps I am actually guilty of complacency, seeking to shield myself from
outside distractions that may deter me from living day to day doing what my
family and I choose to do: ranch. I am sure in everyone’s life there comes a
time when complacency just doesn’t “cut it,” when it is necessary to step up
to the plate and take a stand.
When faced with the prospect of a Canadian company building a pipeline
through our property and across the state of Nebraska, our secure life of
complacency abruptly ended.
When TransCanada released its plans to build Keystone XL Pipeline, a
36-inch-diameter pipeline carrying 650,000-plus barrels of crude oil per day
from Alberta, Canada, to Houston, we were at first reluctant to believe that
it was indeed an actuality.
Further research and eventual public meetings brought the entire plan into
focus. We found ourselves facing the prospect of this vast project bisecting
our ranches in Keya Paha, Rock and Holt counties. Our initial concern was
with the damage that the construction itself would have on our fragile
Sandhill pastures. As the pipeline would snake its way across the country,
it would require a 110-foot easement (50-foot permanent and 60-foot
temporary). We knew all too well what disturbing this type of soil would
create and became determined to do whatever we could not to let that happen.
We always have believed that the best defense in any situation is knowledge.
We began to educate ourselves, using every source at our disposal to learn
about this company’s plans for our future. The more we researched, the more
nervous we became. It soon became apparent that this threat went beyond the
perimeters of our own ranch and was a threat to the entire state of
Nebraska.
As the media began filling our homes with news of the BP oil spill in the
Gulf of Mexico, a pipeline leak in Salt Lake City and oil spewing from a
ruptured pipeline in Michigan contaminating the ocean, lakes and rivers, we
knew that the lifeblood of the entire Midwest, the Ogallala Aquifer, was in
imminent danger.
One hundred thousand letters were submitted, testimony was given, officials
were contacted and good news was received. The State Department delayed the
permitting process until more information could be gathered and until a more
complete environmental impact statement could be drafted. As we relished in
this small victory, TransCanada remained relentless, going so far as to
threaten eminent domain on landowners who refused to sign easements on a
project yet to be sanctioned by our own government.
In the meantime, word was spreading quickly, much like oil through a clear
running stream, and single voices became choirs, echoing our own qualms.
There is too great of risk to our environment to allow this project to
continue. As in every situation, there are also those proponents who are
singing the accolades of the Keystone XL project: the economic development,
jobs being created, tax revenue collected and, of course, an oil source from
a friendly country. Even landowners who once were as passionate as we are
were suddenly having second thoughts when offers of easement payments were
placed before them.
To this our questions remain the same: How do you place a price tag on the
water source of nearly a million people? How do you justify jeopardizing
that water source for monetary gain? What price are you willing to pay for
the damage caused to thousands of acres of fragile sandhill ground? What
words do you use to explain to your children and grandchildren that their
future may be gravely altered by the choices being made today and all for
financial gain?
This I cannot do. Therefore, I can no longer be complacent nor can I be
silenced. I firmly believe that this pipeline project through the Sandhills
and in the Ogallala Aquifer is grievously wrong at any price.
In the words of Cree Prophecy:
Only after the last tree has been cut down,
Only after the last river has been poisoned,
Only after the last fish has been caught,
Only then will you find that money cannot be eaten.
Teri J. Taylor is a rancher near Newport.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s